Metabolic Balance for Maximum Health 6/06

Juvenon Health Journal Vol. 5 No. 6, June 2006 In light of the obesity epidemic, scientists have redoubled their efforts to understand the signaling mechanisms in the brain that regulate appetite and monitor levels of stored food and circulating nutrients. The signaling protein mTOR, acting on the hypothalamus within a signaling complex, has been shown to modulate feeding and body weight. For further information on this research, click here. “mTOR tells the brain that the body is hungry” Nature Medicine 12, 615 – 617 (2006). This Research Update column highlights articles related to recent scientific inquiry into the process of human aging. It is not intended to promote any specific ingredient, regimen, or use and should not be construed as evidence of the safety, effectiveness, or intended uses of the Juvenon product. The Juvenon label should be consulted for intended uses and appropriate directions for use of the product. By Benjamin V. Treadwell, Ph.D. We have all heard the words, “life is a balancing act.” The phrase usually applies to mixing work, play and other activities to achieve a healthy mental-physical state. It turns out that the health of our body at the biochemical level is also a balancing act …

Moderate Exercise: the Elixir of Mental Health 5/06

Juvenon Health Journal Vol. 5 No. 5, May 2005 Astute scientists have been intrigued by the observation that anti-depressive drugs enter the brain quickly but take weeks to generate positive effects. Experimental evidence led them to the discovery that a decrease in the synthesis of new neurons in the hippocampus might be linked to depression. They also observed that the anti-depressive drugs increased the synthesis of new neurons. Further, they noted that the time to generate new neurons approximated the time it took the drugs to work. Since exercise also promotes synthesis of new neurons, they designed an experiment to test the idea that exercise could help ameliorate depression. For details on this research, click here. “Antidepressant effects of exercise: Evidence for an adult-neurogenesis hypothesis?” J Psychiatry Neurosci. 2006 March; 31(2): 84–92. This Research Update column highlights articles related to recent scientific inquiry into the process of human aging. It is not intended to promote any specific ingredient, regimen, or use and should not be construed as evidence of the safety, effectiveness, or intended uses of the Juvenon product. The Juvenon label should be consulted for intended uses and appropriate directions for use of the product. By Benjamin V. Treadwell, Ph.D. Sigmund …

From Carbs to Fat to Diabetes

The food pyramid has recently been rearranged to promote more whole grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes, and fewer simple carbohydrates (so-called bad). The major emphasis is to stay away from those simple carbohydrates with a high glycemic index (foods made from refined flour and sugar, and which the body readily converts to simple sugars). Simple carbohydrates have been shown to produce a sharp elevation in blood-glucose levels, which promotes disease. Why the sudden change away from these carbs?

Cholesterol, High Blood Pressure, Diseased Arteries: Making the Connection

The blood vessels of the body are lined with what are called endothelial cells. One of the primary functions of these cells is to maintain the canals that deliver nutrients to the tissues of the body. In recent cardiovascular research, the link between atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and the health of the endothelial cells has become increasingly clear. For a scientific review of the recent research, click here. “Nitric oxide pathway as new drug targets for refractory hypertension.” Curr Pharm Des. 2005;11(25):3307-15. This Research Update column highlights articles related to recent scientific inquiry into the process of human aging. It is not intended to promote any specific ingredient, regimen, or use and should not be construed as evidence of the safety, effectiveness, or intended uses of the Juvenon product. The Juvenon label should be consulted for intended uses and appropriate directions for use of the product. You do the right thing by making a yearly office visit to your healthcare professional, and you try to heed his/her advice. But often you’re not sure, since there is so much conflicting information out there. This lack of conviction is at least partly due to the fact that it is difficult for health professionals …

Familiar Amino Acid with New Potential: Cysteine

Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), more simply known as oxidants, are the widely recognized culprits responsible for the functional decline of the mitochondria during aging (mitochondria are the organelles that power all of our cells, except red blood cells). In a recent animal study, scientists demonstrated that by restricting the caloric content of the diet of laboratory animals, and by giving them the amino acid N-acetyl-L-cysteine or NAC, they could counteract both ROS generation and effects during aging. In essence, old mitochondria were converted to young ones. “Effect of Antioxidant Diets on Mitochondrial Gene Expression in Rat Brain During Aging” Neurochemical Research, Volume 30, Nos 6/7, June/July 2005, pp. 737-752. This Research Update column highlights articles related to recent scientific inquiry into the process of human aging. It is not intended to promote any specific ingredient, regimen, or use and should not be construed as evidence of the safety, effectiveness, or intended uses of the Juvenon product. The Juvenon label should be consulted for intended uses and appropriate directions for use of the product. By Benjamin V. Treadwell, Ph.D. It is not uncommon for medical science to discover additional benefits of a common nutrient initially thought to serve limited specific functions …

The French Paradox and Red Wine

Juvenon Health Journal volume 2 number 12 december 2003 By Benjamin V. Treadwell, Ph.D. Wouldn’t it be nice to wine and dine on mouth-watering, high-fat foods, and still maintain a healthy cardiovascular system, as well as a sharp mind? And maybe live longer as well? Research data indicate this is exactly what the French are able to do. The French are known for their high intake of fatty foods and for wine consumption. Yet the incidence of heart disease in France is 40% lower than predicted for their high-fat diet. THE FRENCH PARADOX AND RED WINE Research to explain this phenomenon, dubbed “The French Paradox,” focuses on a particular component in wine, particularly red wine. Research has led to some fascinating discoveries and perhaps to a more profound understanding of the aging process and how it may be manipulated to increase life expectancy. It has been suspected for some time that chemicals in wine function as antioxidants, helping to protect the cardiovascular system from inflammation-induced oxidative damage. These compounds, called polyphenols, are known to contain potent antioxidant properties. However, what is even more exciting is that one of the polyphenolic compounds present in wine has the capacity to mimic the …

Antioxidants: How They Protect Our Cells 10/03

Juvenon Health Journal volume 2 number 10 october 2003 By Benjamin V. Treadwell, Ph.D. It’s likely that anyone who pays even passing attention to his or her health is aware that antioxidants are generally good for us. But what are they, really? How do antioxidants work? Are some better than others? WHAT ARE ANTIOXIDANTS? Before we get to the “anti” part of the story, let’s begin with the oxidants that the “antis” fight. The sun is a source of oxidants familiar to all. Its effects on manufactured products are well known. Colors fade in clothing, plastics, and on painted surfaces. The rubber tires on your car harden and then crack. The sun essentially takes the life out of the products exposed to its rays. This happens because sun’s ultraviolet rays disrupt the chemical bonds that hold together materials such as rubber and plastics. Electrons in pairs characterize these bonds. The sun’s energy agitates the electrons and splits off some of them, leaving disrupted or broken bonds with, figuratively speaking, jagged ends characterized by a single unpaired electron. The unglued or broken bond with its single unpaired electron is an oxidant. And it doesn’t like the single life. It aggressively pursues …

The Eight Faces of Vitamin E

By Benjamin V. Treadwell, Ph.D. Without vitamin E, we essentially turn rancid. Vitamin E is fat-soluble, that is, able to penetrate the fatty areas of our tissues. As it does so, it neutralizes toxic oxidants and protects oxidant-sensitive membranes. Thus vitamin E is justifiably known as an antioxidant, and for helping to prevent age-associated increases in oxidative insults to our bodies. THE EIGHT FORMS OF VITAMIN E In reality, vitamin E comes in eight different forms, all of which are derived from plants. The eight E’s are divided into two classes: The tocopherols consist of 4 types of vitamin E, alpha, beta, gamma, and delta. The features distinguishing each are slight chemical differences (location and number of methyl groups) on its core structure. The tocotrienols are virtually identical to the tocopherols in structure, except for the presence of 3 unsaturated bonds (hence trienol). Alpha, beta, gamma and delta tocotrienols are more permeable to cell membranes because of their unsaturated bonds. This chemical difference imparts certain advantages over the less permeable tocopherols. The most potent antioxidant of the group is alpha tocopherol. For reasons still unknown, this form of E represents the bulk of vitamin E present in our serum. This …