Americans More Concerned with Physical and Mental Deterioration than Vanity; Energy Decline More Prevalent in Women Age 45+ Than Men

Americans More Concerned with Physical and Mental Deterioration than Vanity; Energy Decline More Prevalent in Women Age 45+ Than Men America’s “Attitudes on Aging” Explored in Nationwide Study Orinda, CA – May 25, 2004 – A study released today debunks the common perception that Americans are obsessed with vanity when it comes to aging. The study, commissioned by emerging nutraceutical company, Juvenon, Inc., shows that for two out of three Americans, the leading age-related worry is “deteriorating physical condition.” One in two Americans is concerned with “loss of mental sharpness.” Only 8 percent place “gray hair” at the top of their concerns about aging, and 4 percent place “wrinkles” at the top of their concerns. “As Americans are bombarded with marketing images that promote maintaining a youthful image, they spend billions of dollars a year on cosmetic anti-aging products,” said Dr. Ben Treadwell, Scientific Adviser to Juvenon. “In spite of the numbers of people who subscribe to the thought that aging can be confronted from the outside-in, it’s comforting to know that an overwhelming majority of the respondents surveyed are more concerned with the aging process from the inside out.” How Aging is Experienced: Men vs. Women Response Women (Age …

UC Berkeley Press Release

UC Berkeley Press Release — Feb. 18, 2002 Berkeley – Two dietary supplements straight off the health food store shelf put the spark back into aging rats, and might do the same for aging baby boomers, according to a study at the University of California, Berkeley, and Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute. A team of researchers led by Bruce N. Ames, professor of molecular and cell biology at UC Berkeley, fed older rats two chemicals normally found in the body’s cells and available as dietary supplements: acetyl L-carnitine and an antioxidant, alpha lipoic acid. In three articles in the February 19 issue of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Ames and his colleagues report the surprising results. Not only did the older rats do better on memory tests, they had more pep, and the energy-producing organelles in their cells worked better. “With the two supplements together, these old rats got up and did the Macarena,” said Ames, also a researcher at Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI). “The brain looks better, they are full of energy – everything we looked at looks more like a young animal.” “The animals seem to have much more vigor and are much more …