Avoid these 7 drugs to decrease your dementia risk

Most of us harbor some nagging fears about the onset of dementia. To reduce the risk, you may take proactive steps like upping physical exercise, playing brain games and eating certain foods. But you should also be learning what not to do. There are certain kinds of toxins that you should avoid to protect your brain’s health. These drugs can range from seemingly innocent over-the-counter cold medicines to prescription pain medications. What do they have in common? They block acetylcholine, a key neurotransmitter in the body, which is a mechanism that leads to lower brain function. In fact, research has linked these drugs to increased risk of dementia and also to hospitalizations in older adults. They actually are thought to have the opposite effect of medications often used to treat Alzheimer’s, which work to increase acetylcholine. Sometimes, you can’t avoid taking certain drugs, but if’s definitely worth avoiding them if possible. Here are seven common types of anticholinergic drugs. Sedating antihistamines Take heed when you see “diphenhydramine” on the label (brand name Benadryl). Non-sedating antihistamines, containing “loratadine” (brand name Claritin) are much safer for the brain. PM over-the-counter painkillers Most of your favorite OTC painkiller, such as Tylenol and Motrin, …

Memory Loss and Exercise

Sweat Yourself Smart New evidence says exercise can reduce dementia risk Here at Juvenon, we are fascinated by scientific research that delves into mitochondrial function (AKA your energy metabolism). To that end, we revisit and update our content as we discover exciting new evidence that links exercise with improved mitochondrial function. The proven benefits are many, from better energy and longevity to reduction of dementia risk. The Mighty Mitochondria Essentially metabolism is a collection of mitochondria. These are the spark plugs of the cells that are responsible for metabolism. The greater the activity of the cell, the more mitochondria it has. Regardless of their location, when these little dynamos aren’t operating cleanly and efficiently, it impedes your metabolism, resulting in energy slow down throughout your body. This in turn, puts you at risk for a host of illnesses and diseases of aging. How Exercise Can Repair an Inefficient Metabolism It probably doesn’t come as a surprise that exercise helps your metabolism, but you may be interested to know why. Aside from burning calories from the food we eat on a daily basis, exercise normalizes our metabolism by establishing balance. Our bodies seek an economy of scale in which certain aspects of physiological strength, capacity, endurance and speed are forfeited when they aren’t regularly …

Fear of Falling: 4 Danger Zones to Avoid

According to AARP, one in three adults of the age of 65 fall every year; with many sustaining serious injuries such as a broken hip or head trauma. Indeed, a bad fall can be a lifestyle game changer. Sadly, every year, more than 2.5 million older adults are treated for fall-related injuries in emergency departments, and upwards of 734,000 are hospitalized.

Getting Sugar Smart: Know Your Nemesis

Is sugar just as sweet despite a clever alias? Nutritional experts say absolutely, and point out that it’s important to know sugar’s different guises as we all need to be eating a whole lot less of it. These days it’s hard to find “sugar” listed on the sweet-tasting ingredient label. Instead, these secret sugar sources go under cover with different monikers. What’s more, there’s plenty of added sugar in foods that don’t even taste all that sweet.

5 Ways To Avoid A Stroke

Sadly, every year about 140,000 Americans die as a result of a stroke. What’s more, strokes are also the leading cause of serious long-term disability. You’ve likely heard how you can reduce your risk by controlling your blood pressure and cholesterol, losing excess weight, not smoking and getting regular exercise. However, researchers have discovered five other steps that may help reduce the risk of stroke.