Are you deficient in this hardworking vitamin?

Essential for brain health, a strong immune system and weight management, Vitamin D3 is a fat-soluble vitamin that your body can get through sun exposure, food or supplements. However, nearly 50 percent of the population worldwide suffers from vitamin D3 deficiency? Of those at special risk are older adults and those people with limited sun exposure. It’s dubbed the “sunshine vitamin,” because your body can make it through sun exposure. Therefore, health professionals now recommend getting at least 5-30 minutes of sun exposure daily. Sounds easy, eh? Well, for those living too far from the equator, getting that daily sunshine fix can be tricky. To add to the problem, vitamin D3 is found naturally in only a handful of foods, including cod liver oil, sardines, salmon, mackerel, mushrooms and raw milk. Don’t fancy fish and the like? Quality supplementation is advised to meet the recommended daily amount of 600 IU. There are many benefits to vitamin D3, but these three top our list of reasons why you should make friends with this super hero vitamin. Brain Power: Vitamin D is important for brain health and promising research has shown a link between Alzheimer’s disease and vitamin D deficiency. It’s not …

Eight Ways to Up Your Healthy Omega-3 Fat Intake

Chances are you’ve heard about the mega health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids. These polyunsaturated fats, which play a crucial role in cell function, are also helpful in reducing harmful inflammation that can be a harbinger to heart disease. What’s more, omega-3s have also been found to decrease triglyceride levels and blood pressure and may help to prevent fatal heart arrhythmias.

5 Myths of Back Pain

According to the North American Spine Society, approximately 80% of Americans will experience some kind of back pain in their lives. However, 90% of those folks will likely get better without treatment or by using conservative treatments such as anti-inflammatory medications, exercise and physical therapy.

Can your diet defeat diabetes?

Here’s some interesting information from a doctor who believes those with type 2 diabetes should ignore American Diabetes Association’s dietary advice and opt for a healthy low carb, high fat diet. Dr. Sarah Hallberg’s evidence comes from a study her clinic performed, where 50 people with type 2 diabetes were treated with her recommended low-carb high-fat diet. She treated another 50 patients with ADA guidelines. After six months, the study concluded that the patients treated with Hallberg’s recommended diet were able to decrease their insulin by nearly 500 units a day, on average. Those in the ADA group, however, had to boost their insulin by an average of 350 units a day.