Exercise: Gene Activator for Health and Strength

Juvenon Health Journal Volume 2 Number 4 – April 2003 Wishful thinkers are often ingenious in their ability to rationalize the avoidance of exercise. Some worry whether too much exercise would wear them out prematurely. Others question whether an older body really needs to break into a sweat. Recent discoveries, combined with a widely accepted theory of aging, clearly counter these rationalizations and document how exercise initiates a coordinated series of responses by the cells of the body culminating in greater strength, energy and stamina. The mitochondrial theory of aging is widely accepted. It states that cumulative damage to the mitochondria, the power plants in each cell, contributes to physical decline, a wide variety of degenerative conditions, and ultimately to cell death. Maintaining mitochondrial health is therefore essential to successful aging. This is where exercise comes in. Here’s how it works. More Mitochondria Without The Hard Work? Recent research with animals has demonstrated that it is possible, at least with some cells, to artificially increase the production of mitochondria without exercise. The authors demonstrated that they could increase the production of mitochondria by introducing a gene to overproduce one of the key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, known as CaMK. This research may …