5 Ways to Preserve Your Hearing And Avoid Hearing Aids

Did you know that, according to AARP, more than 48 million Americans have some type of hearing loss that seriously disrupts their life? What’s more, that includes 1 in 6 baby boomers and two-thirds of those over 70. And as our boomers age that number is expected to rise significantly in the future. Hearing aids address this frustrating issue; however they are an unwanted expense and stigma for some people. Fortunately, there are proven strategies to protect and improve your hearing that don’t involve hearing aids. In a nutshell, a healthy body and mind are much less susceptible to hearing loss. Here are five lifestyle tweaks that can preserve your ears for years. Get Your Heart Pumping! Cardio exercise — walking, running, cycling — helps to improve blood flow to your ears, which is good for your hearing. Wear a helmet for biking because a fall that results in concussion can harm your hearing.  Make Friends With Ear Protection: Protect your hearing and avoid loud situations whenever possible. Earplugs do more than dull the sound of a snoring spouse. They can protect your ears from the loud noise of machinery like lawn mowers and power tools. Comfortable plugs and noise-canceling headphones …

A New Vitamin Found in…Beer?

By now avid Juvenon Health Journal readers are familiar with the potential health benefits of vitamin B3/niacin, as we’ve touched upon this important topic frequently. In this month’s Juvenon Health Journal we explore exciting new findings on this vitamin with emphasis on a recently isolated niacin metabolite, nicotinamide riboside.

Beyond Diet and Exercise: Controlling Blood Sugar

According to the recently published National Diabetes Report, over 29 million people in the United States have diabetes. That’s nearly 10% of the population. Perhaps more disconcerting is that nearly 30% of those folks go undiagnosed, unaware that they even have the disease. All told, adult type 2 diabetes accounts for 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes.

Avoid these 7 drugs to decrease your dementia risk

Most of us harbor some nagging fears about the onset of dementia. To reduce the risk, you may take proactive steps like upping physical exercise, playing brain games and eating certain foods. But you should also be learning what not to do. There are certain kinds of toxins that you should avoid to protect your brain’s health. These drugs can range from seemingly innocent over-the-counter cold medicines to prescription pain medications. What do they have in common? They block acetylcholine, a key neurotransmitter in the body, which is a mechanism that leads to lower brain function. In fact, research has linked these drugs to increased risk of dementia and also to hospitalizations in older adults. They actually are thought to have the opposite effect of medications often used to treat Alzheimer’s, which work to increase acetylcholine. Sometimes, you can’t avoid taking certain drugs, but if’s definitely worth avoiding them if possible. Here are seven common types of anticholinergic drugs. Sedating antihistamines Take heed when you see “diphenhydramine” on the label (brand name Benadryl). Non-sedating antihistamines, containing “loratadine” (brand name Claritin) are much safer for the brain. PM over-the-counter painkillers Most of your favorite OTC painkiller, such as Tylenol and Motrin, …